Toll-Free(877) 688-2729
 

The Full Guide to No-Touch Catheters

by AmyHernandez June 26 2018 05:51



Since the introduction of clean intermittent catheterization as an alternate way to drain the bladder, there have been many advances in cathing techniques as well as new types of catheter products.

No-touch catheterization techniques and no-touch catheters have become increasingly popular over the years. This is likely due to the convenience and independence these products can offer, as well as a way to reduce the occurrence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs).

UTIs and CAUTIs can be an issue for many people who perform intermittent self-catheterization, which is why sterility is most often at the top of the list of most important things to consider when deciding which intermittent catheter type is right for you.

WHAT IS A NO-TOUCH CATHETER?

A no-touch catheter, also known as a touch-free catheter or touchless catheter, is a urinary catheter that can be inserted without the user having to directly touch the catheter tube (the portion of the catheter system that is inserted into the urethra).

No-touch catheters have been available on the market for several years; however, they are generally called closed system catheters or sterile catheter kits.

Closed system catheters are either pre-lubricated or have a hydrophilic coating that is easily activated by sterile water to become lubricated. What makes a no-touch closed system catheter truly unique is that it is an all-in-one option that is housed inside its own sterile collection bag. The catheter tube can be easily manipulated and advanced forward to insert into the urethra without touching it, which minimizes the risk of contamination from the hands.

Another benefit of closed system catheters is that the majority of them come with what is known as an introducer tip. The introducer tip is usually a pre-lubricated, soft, flexible cover that shields the tip of the actual catheter tube and helps it bypass the first short section of the urethra where the highest concentrations of bacteria can be found. This also does its part in potentially reducing the risk of contracting a UTI.

Many brands of closed systems will come packaged with additional insertion supplies that can make the cathing process even more hygienic. This may include items like gloves and antiseptic wipes.

WHY SHOULD I USE A NO-TOUCH CATHETER?

There are many reasons why using a no-touch catheter might be the best option for you, depending on your lifestyle, preferences, and needs.

Of course, the added protection against contamination from touching and bacteria, as mentioned above, is a huge reason why many people prefer and chose to use no-touch catheters.

Touch-free catheterization has been shown to be incredibly effective at preventing the onset of catheter associated UTIs in spinal cord injured people. Clinical studies have shown the use of a no-touch catheter is associated with a 30% UTI reduction and general low UTI rates of .68% in a study conducted with spinal cord injured people.

Medicare may also cover these advanced catheter products for catheters users who have experienced two or more documented urinary tract infections (UTIs) within a single year while using sterile straight intermittent catheters and sterile lubrication packets.

In hospitals, the introduction of no-touch catheter systems and techniques has been well accepted by both caregivers and patients, and has not been associated with higher costs. On the contrary, it has actually reduced costs while saving time and reducing infection complications in general, according to Clinical studies.

NO-TOUCH CATHETER OPTIONS

There are a few different options when it comes to choosing a no-touch catheter system, depending on your insurance coverage. If your insurance policy does not currently cover closed system catheters, which are billed under HCPC code A4353, you may still be able to qualify for a hydrophilic catheter.

Here are the two main options of no-touch catheters:

Closed System Catheters

Closed system catheters are the preferred cathing system for many, including people in wheelchairs, children, and those frequently travel, work, or go to school. This is because of their convenience as well as the ability to reduce the risk of infection with the all-in-one system and introducer tip, which helps minimize the risk of contamination or pushing harmful bacteria into the bladder. One of the most popular closed system catheters on the market is the Bard Touchless Plus kit, which features a patented catheter guide, allowing for better control during insertion.

Hydrophilic Catheters

Hydrophilic catheters come pre-hydrated and ready to use, or they can be easily activated by an included sterile water packet. Once it’s ready to use, the catheter stays optimally lubricated and offers a more comfortable, smooth insertion. Hydrophilic catheters work to minimize urethral friction, which can also help reduce the risk of infection. Most hydrophilic catheters are considered no-touch catheters, thanks to included handling sleeves that keep your hands off of the catheter tube and help guide the catheter into the urethra. You may be interested in the popular GentleCath™ Glide, a no-touch hydrophilic catheter for both males and females. It was created specifically to make cathing more comfortable and reduce the mess sometimes left behind by alternate brands of hydrophilic catheters.

Intermittent straight catheters are not typically considered no-touch catheters, but there are cathing techniques which can reduce the risk of contamination from your hands, such as using gloves and antiseptic wipes during your catheterization routine.

Still not sure which catheter option is right for you? Contact us today and speak with a trained catheter specialist who can help you decide which intermittent catheter is best for your unique circumstances. Your health is too important to risk not using the right catheter product.

Disclaimer: Please note that this post is not to be taken as medical advice and is only intended to provide a general understanding of the potential risks of reusing catheters according to research. This information should not be used in place of the recommendations and medical advice of your professional healthcare provider.

Sources:Bennett CJ, Young MN and Darrington H. PubMed. 1995.

Bennett CJ, Young MN, Razi SS, Adkins R, Diaz F, McCrary A. PubMed. 1997.


Related Posts You May Find Helpful:


About the Author:

Amy is the Web Marketing Specialist at 180 Medical. Her favorite thing about working at 180 Medical is being part of a company that is truly committed to improving the lives of its customers. When she's not at work she enjoys traveling, kayaking, rock climbing, and spending time with her husband and three, incredible stepkids.

Top 5 Ways to Make Cathing Less Painful

by Jessica April 27 2018 01:48
top 5 ways to make cathing less painful

Have you just been told you need to start using intermittent catheters, and now you're wondering how bad a catheter will hurt?

Or have you been self-cathing for a while but still find the catheterization process painful or just plain uncomfortable?

male catheter insertion painWhatever your reason for seeking help with catheter pain, know that there are many people who use catheters painlessly every day to treat their medical conditions like bladder retention or urinary incontinence, and that's a possibility for you too!

Of course, if you ever experience an abnormal amount of pain or bleeding during insertion, or if you encounter a blockage, it's important to never force your catheter. We suggest you discuss these issues with your treating healthcare professional as soon as possible. 

However, sometimes it's simply a matter of finding the right urinary catheter product that will work best for your individual needs.

Find out some of the top solutions to make cathing smooth, comfortable, and practically pain-free!

Top 5 Ways to Make Using a Catheter Hurt Less


1. Use an Intermittent Catheter With Polished or Recessed Eyelets.


catheter drainage eyeletsDrainage eyelets are the small holes near the insertion tip of your urinary catheter. Your urine drains through these holes, into the catheter tube, and out the end into your chosen receptacle like a toilet, urinal, or an attached collection bag.

Some catheter manufacturers use a process similar to punching a hole in a sheet of paper to create their catheter eyelets. This can result in rough eyelet edges that create drag and discomfort as the catheter is inserted and taken back out.

Fortunately, there are plenty of catheter options with smooth, polished eyelets, and these can greatly reduce friction on your delicate urethral tissue.

gentlecath cathetersOne catheter brand to consider is GentleCath™. GentleCath™ catheters are designed with recessed, polished drainage eyelets on a smooth, rounded insertion tip for maximum comfort and reduced urethral trauma.

If the catheter type you're currently using has any rough edges around the eyelets, this could very well be the source of your discomfort. 



2. Use lubrication with your uncoated catheters.

When using straight intermittent catheters, it's important to make sure you're manually lubricating them before each use. Lubrication will reduce friction and discomfort as your catheter passes through the urethra to your bladder. 

Of course, every person and each anatomy is different, so while some people don't need as much lubricating jelly, others may need more in order to have a truly comfortable catheterization. 

As the leading provider of intermittent catheters and related urological products, 180 Medical carries many high-quality and reputable brands of lubricating jelly to suit your needs, including bacteriostatic and kosher options. Whether you prefer your catheter lubrication in a tube or perfectly dosed single-use packets, we can supply it.



3. Issues getting the catheter to insert? You may need a coudé tip catheter.

gentlecath coude catheterWhy are coudé catheters necessary? This sort of curved insertion tip is only needed when straight tip catheters will not work.

This is usually due to medical conditions like urethral strictures or an enlarged prostate, which can make it difficult and even impossible for a straight tip catheter to bypass and navigate around to reach the bladder.

If you feel you're encountering a blockage or obstacle while trying to get your catheter fully inserted, it's best to speak to your urologist immediately so they can fully diagnose the problem and discuss whether you need a coudé tip catheter.



4. Are you experiencing itchiness or irritation after using a latex catheter? You may have a latex allergy.

Less than 1% of people in the US have a latex allergy. However, it is more common in people with certain medical conditions like spina bifida. Latex allergy development has also been associated with people who use latex urinary catheters.

If you suspect this may be the issue, contact your doctor as soon as possible.

180 Medical is sensitive to our customers' concerns and needs, so we make it a point to stock an incredibly wide variety of latex-free catheter products. For those who prefer the softness and flexibility of red rubber latex catheters, there are many options we have available to try out, including soft catheters and silicone catheters.



5. Switch to a more advanced and modern catheter product.

Catheter technology continues to move forward, and many manufacturers are developing their urethral catheter products to be more efficient, comfortable, discreet, and convenient. 

If you've been using one type of catheter for many years, you may be happy to hear that there are all kinds of catheter options available on the market that may reduce urethral pain.

There are additional benefits of using advanced catheter products like hydrophilic catheters, closed system catheters, pre-lubricated catheters, and compact pocket catheters, such as potentially minimizing the risk of UTIs (urinary tract infections).

Just a few of the many advanced technology catheters that 180 Medical has in stock include:


SpeediCath® Compact Set
Available in Male Length or Female Length

speedicath compact set for men
Not only is this closed system catheter small and discreet for easy carrying, it is ready to use as soon as you open it. The catheter's hydrophilic coating is pre-activated since it is housed inside its own sterile saline solution. The lubrication will be smooth and comfortable throughout catheterization. An additional bonus of the SpeediCath® Compact Set is that the catheter comes with its own collection bag, making this a great option for those who want a more comfortable catheter that's also great for travel and use in public restrooms.

gentlecath glide hydrophilic catheter
GentleCath™ Glide Hydrophilic Catheter

Available in Male Length or Female Length


The GentleCath™ Glide is one of the newer catheter products on the market that is quickly becoming a popular option for those who want a hydrophilic catheter that is easy to use, potentially minimizes the risk of UTIs, and makes cathing super smooth and comfortable from the moment you insert the catheter until you withdraw it. Just pop the included water sachet to activate its low-friction hydrophilic coating featuring FeelClean™ technology, and it's ready to go!


LoFric Origo™ Hydrophilic Catheter
Available in Male Length, Pediatric Length, and with Coudé Tip

lofric origo hydrophilic catheter
The LoFric Origo™ has a hydrophilic coating with Urotonic™ surface technology that is activated by its own included sterile saline solution. Just as its name suggests, this catheter offers you an ultra low-friction cathing experience. An additional bonus is that the packaging is foldable and discreet, and it also doubles as a disposal bag for maximum privacy once you've finished cathing.



Still Experiencing Catheter Pain?

For first-time users, there may be some slight discomfort at first as your body adjusts to this new process of catheterization. However, if you continue feeling pain when cathing or if it even hurts too much to self-cath, please talk to your doctor before trying any other solutions on your own. 

There may be underlying medical conditions if these suggestions don't help alleviate your catheter pain. We suggest speaking with your urologist to pinpoint the issue and to come up with a solution together that will work best for your needs. 

If you need any help finding a catheter that may help reduce your discomfort during cathing, contact our specialists today!



Disclaimer: This blog is not to be taken as medical advice and is only intended to provide a general understanding of some of the product options that may reduce discomfort during intermittent catheterization. This information should not be used in place of any recommendations, prescribed treatment plans, or medical advice from your professional healthcare provider.



Related Posts You May Find Helpful:




About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for nearly 9 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company.

MTG Eagle Board for Quadriplegic Self-Catheterizing

by Mason April 6 2018 05:37
mtg eagle board for quadriplegic self catheterization

My name is Mason Ellis. I was involved in a car accident during my senior year of high school, which rendered me quadriplegic with a C5 spinal cord injury. You can read more about my story here. Since then, I have been actively working on beating my spinal cord injury every day.

It's my goal to use my experience to help and inspire others. I like to peer mentor and volunteer when I can, and one of my primary ways of reaching out to others with spinal cord injuries is through my YouTube channel.  My wide variety of original videos include educational information about quadriplegia, including what tenodesis is and why quadriplegics sometimes experience spasms, as well as helpful how-to videos like dressing yourself as a quadriplegic.


mason ellis


Self-Cathing After a Spinal Cord Injury

After a spinal cord injury, catheterizing may be a necessity, depending on your level of injury. Using intermittent catheters can keep your bladder from over-filling and prevent leakage. However, self-cathing can be difficult if you are a quadriplegic with poor hand dexterity. 

When I was first injured as a C5 quadriplegic, I was unable to self-cath until about a year after my injury. That's when 180 Medical introduced me to the MTG EZ-Gripper® closed system catheter. 

Another helpful product I recently discovered that can help quadriplegics and others with limited hand dexterity with the process of catheterization is the MTG Eagle™ Board. The Eagle™ Board, manufactured by MTG (Medical Technologies of Georgia), was created to help catheter-users with low or limited dexterity perform self-catheterization on their own.

This adaptive cathing board, pictured below, is designed to be used with the MTG EZ-Gripper® closed system catheter and works to help with inserting your catheter into the bladder. 


mtg eagle board pictured with ez gripper catheter


MTG Eagle™ Board's Features

The MTG Eagle™ Board has many features that can help male catheter-users who live with poor hand dexterity, whether due to a spinal cord injury or another condition like transverse myelitis or spina bifida.

The MTG Eagle™ Board's unique features include:

Repositionable "Wings"
The adjustable wings on the bottom of the Eagle Board allow it to rest comfortably between your thighs at just the right angle so your urine will flow easily into your closed system catheter bag.

mtg eagle board on catheter user's lapPants Hook
The adjustable pants hook holds your pants down for you, which frees your hands and makes catheterizing much easier.

Thumb Holes
There are two thumb or finger holes near the top of the Eagle Board that allow you to easily maneuver it between your legs or pick it up with minimal effort.

Housing Clip
The housing clip works to lock the catheter down to the Eagle Board securely, leaving your hands free. 

Penile Lever
The magnetic penile lever sets the penis in place for inserting the catheter tube. 

Foam Pads
The foam pads are used to keep soft contact against your skin and can be adjusted for different body types and even replaced if worn down after many uses.

Allen Screws
The Allen screws are used to tighten the adjustable wings, which keeps the board at the proper angle for inserting the catheter tube. 

Latex-Free
Convenient for those with latex allergies. 

Convenient Size & Design
The Eagle Board is also small and compact enough that you can carry it in a backpack or briefcase with ease wherever you go. If you get it dirty, it's easy to wash off and dry or wipe down with an antibacterial wipe, so you can reuse it every time you self-cath.


mtg eagle board for self cathing


How to Use the MTG Eagle™ Board

Take a look at my full video explaining how to use the MTG Eagle™ Board to get closer look at the size and shape of this helpful adaptive cathing accessory. I discuss and point out each of its features and give you a step-by-step tutorial of how to use the Eagle™ Board as a part of your cathing routine. 



Once you adjust the wings for the proper angle and attach the MTG EZ-Gripper® catheter, supplied by 180 Medical, press down on the blue handle (gripper) on the catheter tube and move your hand toward yourself to insert the tube into your urethra until it reaches the bladder and your urine starts to flow into the bag. I also have a video showing how to use the MTG EZ-Gripper®, if you'd like to learn more about this particular closed system catheter.

I have found that the MTG Eagle™ Board allows for easy catheter insertion because it provides a flat surface to press the catheter against.

180 medical catheterization instructional materials dvd and bookletIf you are newly injured or cannot self-catheterize due to limited hand dexterity, the MTG Eagle™ Board may be a great place to start in order to gain back some of your independence and health! The Eagle™ Board Kit from MTG includes the board, a penile sizing guide, additional foam pads, an Allen wrench, and a carry bag for your convenience.

For more information about how to cath, 180 Medical's catheter specialists are ready to help you find the right catheter for your needs and can walk you through the catheterization process, step by step. They also provide handy cathing instructions online for men, women, and children, and they can put an instructional DVD and full-color booklet in your order as well.

All pictures of the MTG Eagle™ Board have been provided courtesy of MTG. You can find more information about this product at their website.



Related Posts You May Find Helpful:



About the Author:

mason ellis 180 medical blog authorMason Ellis was injured in a car accident on January 19, 2015, which left him with a traumatic brain injury, several broken bones included his jaws, the top six front teeth, and his collarbone. He is now a C5/6/7 quadriplegic paralyzed from the neck down. Since his accident, he has connected with others with spinal cord injuries, family members, friends, and caregivers of someone with a spinal cord injury, therapists and doctors, and able-bodied individuals too. Every day, he refuses to let his spinal cord injury defeat him. His motto is to "live life just like I would've able-bodied." 

You can learn more about Mason in his 180 Medical blog feature, or connect with him and others living with spinal cord injuries on his Facebook page or by subscribing to his YouTube Channel.

3 Types of Female Catheters

by Jessica February 6 2018 06:25
3 female catheter types

If your doctor has recommended intermittent catheterization as part of your treatment plan (whether due to bladder retention, urinary incontinence, multiple sclerosis, a spinal cord injury, or another medical condition that affects the way your bladder works), you may be feeling overwhelmed by the news and wondering where to start.

We completely understand, and we want to assure you that those feelings are perfectly normal. However, once armed with the right information and the right supplies for you, using female catheters can eventually become second nature to you. 

But first, you may want to learn more about the three main types of female intermittent catheters, so here's our simple guide!

Types of Female Intermittent Catheters

Intermittent catheters are small tubes designed to drain urine from the bladder. These are most often composed of vinyl or PVC, silicone, or red rubber latex, and they are considered single-use only devices, since they are inserted into the body via the urethra. Catheters have come a long way since they were first invented, and innovations in technology continue to roll out with new products that may offer a smoother catheterization experience as well as better discretion and ease of use.

woman with backpack Because the female urethra is only a few inches in length compared to the male urethra, female catheters are typically only 6 to 8 inches long, although there are shorter pocket-sized options. Some women prefer to use male length catheters, and this is based on preference and what works best for you.

Concerned about the catheter tube's diameter? That's a common fear, but there's no need to worry. Your prescribing physician will be able to test French sizes with you and properly determine with you what will work best for your individual anatomy and needs.

The right size will help with overall comfort as well as efficiency in drainage. For example, if you use a smaller female catheter French size than what fits your body best, you may notice urine seeping around the sides of the catheter (rather than only draining into the tube and down to your chosen receptacle, like a collection bag or toilet), which can literally leave a mess on your hands. If you use a larger catheter French size than necessary, you may have some difficulty with insertion, or you could experience some discomfort. Making sure to get the right size prescribed before ordering will be a big component in finding the right catheter for you!

After you and your doctor have discussed size options, you'll want to start thinking about the three main intermittent catheter types available for women. 

what female catheter is right for me


The three main types of intermittent catheters are:


Straight Catheters

Considered the original technology, female length straight intermittent catheters are uncoated and must be manually lubricated prior to insertion. Usually, this is done with individual packets of sterile lubricant, although some prefer using the flip-top tubes of lubricant. These can easily be included with your catheter order, and we can take into account what may be easiest for you to use, including factors like limited hand dexterity.

These are available in just about every material, and there are options both with and without color-coded funnels. This typically comes down to personal preference, but you will need to let your supplier know of any potential allergies, such as latex, as well as any chemicals you may want to avoid like DEHP. Sometimes also known as "in and out" catheters, intermittent catheter tubes are uncoated, so they must be manually lubricated before insertion, typically by individual-use packets of sterile lubrication which can be included in your orders.

Straight female catheters are typically fairly easy to conceal in one's pocket, makeup bag, or purse, and one benefit is that these may feel a little lighter than catheters that include additional insertion supplies or water packets, making them simple to carry or pack in one's luggage for traveling.

female straight uncoated catheters



Hydrophilic Catheters

Hydrophilic catheters are similar to straight catheters in many ways, but there's one key feature that makes hydrophilic catheters stand apart from other types. Female hydrophilic catheters have a coating that is activated by water to become slippery, smooth, and ready to use. This coating acts in place of lubricant, so you don't have to worry about carrying along a tube or packets of lubricant with you.

Depending on the brand, some hydrophilic catheters come with their own sterile water packet to burst inside the packaging and let the catheter soak anywhere from a few seconds to half a minute, and then it's ready to use. Others, like the SpeediCath Compact, is pre-packaged in its own sterile saline solution, so as soon as you open up this discreet package (designed to look similar to a makeup item like a tube of mascara or lipstick), your catheter is ready to use and then dispose of easily without muss or fuss once you've drained your bladder.

Most hydrophilic catheter manufacturers feature a handy guiding sleeve to allow you to manipulate the catheter for insertion without touching the tube itself and risking potential contamination from any possible germs left on your hands, even after washing up before use.

female hydrophilic catheters



Closed System Catheters

Female closed system catheters are a convenient option since it's basically an all-in-one system. The catheter itself is pre-lubricated and sterile inside its self-contained collection bag, which eliminates the need to carry additional lubricant, and many brands also have insertion supplies packaged with it as well, such as sterile gloves, an underpad, and antiseptic wipes. Most closed systems also have a pre-lubricated introducer tip that helps to bypass the majority of bacteria in the first few millimeters of the urethra, which further minimizes the risk of infection.

Some people in wheelchairs prefer closed system catheters, since they can sometimes eliminate the need to transfer from your chair to a toilet. Thanks to the self-contained collection bag, you can self-cath anyplace where you have privacy. 

There are options such as gripping aids for those with limited hand dexterity, as well as different materials of catheters, different collection bag sizes, and more. Our Catheter Product Specialists can discuss the different features that may appeal to you or work best for your needs.

female closed system catheters



Since we specialize in catheters as well as ostomy supplies, we carry all the major catheter brands and types, so you have the option to sample what might work best for you, and you have the freedom of choice to pick the brand you prefer.

male intermittent catheter brands


Ultimately, the decision about which type of catheter you should use will come down to your prescribing healthcare professional's assessment of your condition and personal needs. 

180 medical catheter specialist When you're ready to order, 180 Medical is here to serve you and your doctor in helping to select an intermittent catheter that will be easy for you to use while giving you a hygienic, comfortable, and convenient catheterization. 

We are catheter specialists that have been in the business for over fifteen years, and we've helped thousands of women, men, and children find the right catheter supplies. Our goal is to help turn your quality of life around with high-quality catheter products that can restore your confidence and sense of independence. Our catheter specialists will also offer you unparalleled service and a compassionate, listening ear. 

We also offer educational materials like full-color brochures and DVDs offering step-by-step instructions of how to self-cath.

Give us a call at 1-877-688-2729. We'd love the opportunity to discuss your female catheter options with you! 




Related Posts You May Find Helpful:



180 medical jessAbout the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 8 years and is the Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for a company that truly cares for its employees and customers.

 

Pocket Catheters 101

by Jessica November 20 2017 09:05
pocket catheters 101 blog

Whether you've heard about them from your doctor, an online support group, or even television commercials, pocket catheters are one of the most talked about types of intermittent urinary catheters due to their convenience, ease of handling, and their ability to be carried discreetly. Learn all about pocket catheters and similar travel-ready options! 

What Is a Pocket Catheter?

cure pocket catheterA pocket catheter is a widely-used phrase that covers a few different styles of catheters for men, women, and children. The main and most important feature of a pocket catheter is that the packaging is small and discreet enough that is that it can be easily hidden inside a pocket, a purse, briefcase, backpack, or makeup bag, and depending on the brand, even in the palm of your hand as you walk to the restroom.  

Intermittent catheters are often packaged in a straight or longer parcel. Since the typical female length catheter is about 6 to 8 inches in length, they are already fairly easy to conceal. However, for pediatric length catheters, which are usually ten inches or longer, and male length catheters which are at least sixteen inches, users of these styles may want to find a more discreet or low-profile catheter.


catheter types and size comparisons to pocket catheter


What Options of Pocket Catheters Are Available?

Many versions of pocket catheters have all the familiar, high-quality features of the catheters you may already know and use. Depending upon the brand, there will be variations in their packaging, including size, shape, and what additional amenities may be included to aid a more hygienic catheterization, like insertion supplies.


180 medical catheter brand manufacturers


As always, 180 Medical will continue to keep you updated on the latest technology and new catheter products that become available on the market, but here are a few of the different options you may be interested in learning more about.


Pocket Catheters in Curved Packaging

cure pocket catheter xlCure Medical has a pocket version of its standard straight male-length catheter, the Cure U Pocket Catheter, where the entirety of the flexible catheter tube is curved to make the packet smaller, discreet, and more compact. Cure's catheters are made with high-quality material and will not kink when bent.

Cure also has a few other travel-ready options, such as a pocket catheter with lubricant included for your convenience and an extra-long pocket catheter (25 inches long), the Cure Medical® Pocket XL (pictured to the right), which is great for those who often use extension tube connectors or are in wheelchairs. 


easycath pediatric pocket catheter for childrenThe Rusch EasyCath™ Pediatric Pocket Catheter (pictured to the left) is great if you're looking for a pocket catheter for your child.

Once extended from the package, this high-quality PVC vinyl catheter is eleven inches for easy manipulation and it has polished eyelets to aid a smooth insertion. 

If your child is starting to self-cath on their own and needs a discreet catheter option to carry in their backpack or their pocket at school, a pocket catheter like this may be a good choice.



Compact Catheters

cure ultra female length prelubricated pocket catheterThe Cure Ultra (pictured to the right) is a new pocket-sized catheter for both women and men (female length pictured to the right), which features their exclusive CoverAll™ lubrication technology. This ensures an even, smooth distribution of the lubrication as the catheter is removed from its small, easy-to-open package. The design is environmentally friendly and simple to dispose of with minimal waste.

The Ultra is available in straight tip for both men and women, and there is also an option with a curved or coudé tip for those who have difficulty passing a straight tip, the Cure Ultra Coudé Male Catheter.


cure twist female lengthFor women who want a discreet option with less mess and no fuss, the Cure Twist may be a great choice.

The Twist's packaging is designed to look similar to cosmetic products like a mascara tube or lipstick. It has an easy-open twist top. It comes ready to use, since it's pre-lubricated. As soon as you're ready, you can self-cath with no worries about mess or dripping.


speedicath compact female pocket catheterA similarly discreet item (pictured to the right) comes from Coloplast, a brand that has been around since 1957. Their mission is to develop products that make life easier on those who have medical needs, and the Coloplast SpeediCath Compact is certainly a product that fits that description due to its discreet packaging and ease of use.

Available in options for both men and women, it is designed to look like an everyday item like a cosmetic product or a marker.

The female length Compact is approximately 2.75 inches long, perfect for discreetly fitting into your pocket or packing in your suitcase for a vacation without worrying about too much additional bulk alongside your other toiletries and clothes.

coloplast speedicath compact for menThe SpeediCath Compact for Men (pictured at left) is also ultra-discreet with a telescopic design that is less than half the size of a standard male catheter.

These options also come in a set with an integrated collection bag that is instantly ready to use, available both in male length and female length.


The CompactCath (pictured below) has a revolutionary design for ultimate privacy and ease of use. It looks unlike any other catheter on the market today.

The flexible catheter is coiled inside a small plastic case that fits in the palm of your hand. Incredibly easy to pocket or carry, this catheter is also touch-free and is pre-lubricated with a silicone-based oil to aid in a super-smooth, comfortable insertion without need for additional lubricant.

compactcath pocket catheter for men and women


Pocket Closed System Catheters

Closed system catheters are a type of intermittent catheter with an all-in-one collection system. Often, they feature an introducer tip to bypass the highest concentrations of bacteria in the first few millimeters of the urethra, which may reduce the risk of infection.

Closed system catheters have attached collection bags, which gives you the freedom to self-cath wherever you have privacy, making it an ideal choice for those in wheelchairs, children, and those who are frequent travelers. 

RUSCH POCKETPAC CATHETER KITThere are some discreet closed system catheter products that offer even more privacy when you carry them with you, such as the Hollister VaPro Pocket Plus, the Hollister Advance Plus Pocket Catheter System, and the Rusch PocketPac Catheter Kit (pictured to the right), which includes insertion supplies to aid the catheterization experience (gauze, BZK antiseptic wipes, two vinyl gloves, underpad, and a refuse bag to dispose of the catheter when you're done).


Other Discreet Options

Many of the intermittent catheters we carry are of such high quality that you can roll it or curve the packaging inside your pocket without kinking the tube itself or damaging the catheter.

Typically many of our pre-lubricated and hydrophilic catheter options are travel-ready and can be discreetly tucked away, like the GentleCath™ Glide, available for both men and women.

The Glide was designed based on actual feedback from real users of catheters, and it's a great option for people who want a discreet and efficient catheterization experience.

gentlecath glide travel hydrophilic catheter

Take a look at more great options in our catheter showcase today!


How Can I Find the Right Pocket Catheter for Me?

Just contact us to speak with one of our friendly Product Specialists.

We'll be glad to help you find an intermittent catheter that may best fit your individual preferences, and we also verify your insurance for you to determine how and if these products are covered on your policy.

Disclaimer: Please note that this post is intended to provide a general understanding of a few of the product options available that are considered smaller, discreet, or pocket catheters. This information should not be used in place of the recommendations for what type of catheter your professional healthcare provider recommends or prescribes for you to use, based on your personal anatomy and individual needs and preferences. Please consult with your prescribing physician for more information on which type of pocket catheter or travel catheter might work best for you.


Related Posts:


About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 8 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company.

10 Ways to Carry Your Catheter Supplies Discreetly

by Jessica August 12 2016 10:42
10 ways to discreetly carry your catheters blog header

Here at 180 Medical, one of the more common questions our Catheter Specialists hear is: How can I carry my catheters with me as discreetly as possible? 

While there is certainly no shame at all in having to use catheter products for your personal needs, whether due to a condition such as a spinal cord injury, bladder retention, Spina Bifida, or urinary incontinence, it's perfectly natural to want to keep your bathroom habits as private as possible, no matter where you are during the day -- school, work, traveling, church and other social functions, or even at home. 

Here are a few options that we've gathered over the years, some of which are direct tips from daily catheter users like you!

clothing  

1. For the quickest and easiest concealment, you can utilize your clothing to hide your catheter supplies. For instance, during a quick walk from your work or school desk to the bathroom, it's as easy as pocketing a lubricant packet and sliding a catheter package up the sleeve of a long-sleeved shirt or blazer. Some people like to slide a catheter into the waistband of their pants, since some catheters are particularly flexible. One woman told us that on days when she wears tall boots at work, she slides her catheter, still inside its package, down the side of her boot and then walks from her desk to the bathroom with no one being the wiser. Many straight catheters are flexible enough to simply wrap into a circular configuration around your wrist and then store it in your pocket. Just be careful not to kink the catheter as you roll it up. 

There are also options called "money belts," which look like regular belts for your pants or jeans, but have a discreet zipper on the inside in which you can store your catheters.


makeup bag

2. Makeup or cosmetic bags are another convenient option for women or anyone who uses makeup, as they are readily available to purchase and come in a variety of sizes and lengths to suit your needs. Compact catheters such as the Cure Twist or Speedicath Compact are even designed to look similar to lipstick or mascara tubes.


glasses case 

3. An eyeglasses case can be a discreet alternative for any gender or age. Despite the length of the case (typically 6 to 8 inches), most any flexible straight catheter, whether male or female length, will be able to fold over enough to fit inside. Lubricant packets are easy to store inside these cases as well. Some eyeglass cases even come with neck straps, which leaves your hands completely free. You can find these easily for purchase online or even with your local optometrist.


pencil case 

4. Pencil cases are a cheap, discreet way to carry catheters, and depending on the size, they can hold a closed system catheter package as well. This may be an especially helpful alternative for teenagers and children still in school. Pencil pouches or cases can typically be found anywhere office or school supplies are sold. 


purse

5. A purse is another great option for toting your supplies throughout the day, no matter where you go. No one will think anything of it if you take your purse with you to the restroom, especially in public. Purses come in all varieties these days, from large shoulder bags to smaller clutches and cross-body messenger bags, and many of these options are acceptable for anyone to wear. Fanny packs too, also known as waist packs, are a smart, hands-free way to carry your items, and this style is especially helpful for those on vacation or traveling around during the daytime. Forget the puffy neon fanny packs of the 1980s and consider trying out a more stylish, updated pack that slides around your waist as easily as a belt but with a sleek, classic design with multiple pockets and zippers to store all manner of things. You could pack your catheters, your phone, and your wallet all in one small waist-pack and be ready to sight-see on your vacation without having to worry about carrying a large bag with you everywhere you go.


backpack 

6. Backpacks are always a great option, especially for students still in school. Most backpack designs have multiple pockets, both on the outside and inside of the bag itself, which allows for discretion while carrying the backpack throughout the day. For those especially concerned with maximum privacy, there are also locks specifically made just for backpack zippers, which you can find most anywhere school supplies or locks are sold, including stores online.


service dog backpack 

7. If you have a service dog, they're not just your close companion, but they also there to help you perform tasks and help you in many ways. You may or may not be aware that that there are special backpacks made just for dogs that have zippers or even Velcro flaps, perfect for concealing the items you need for your daily activities. These come in different colors and sizes and styles, and it doesn't even require a special order. They fasten rather easily, just like a regular dog harness might. You can find these online to order and even in your local pet supply store. No one will think twice about what might be inside the backpack that your dog is carrying for you, and this could be a great hands-free way for you to make sure your medically-necessary catheter supplies are close at hand at all times.


briefcase 

8. A briefcase or traveling case can be more than sufficient for tucking away one's necessary amount of catheter supplies and accessories, especially for the businessman or woman who may be frequently on the go for their jobs. If you often have to utilize airports for your travel, just remember the TSA's 3-1-1 rule for carry-on luggage. If you carrying a separate lubricant pack or tube, it is safe to bring aboard the airplane as long as it is 3.4 ounces or less in volume. It must fit in a quart-sized clear plastic zip-top baggie. If you're scheduled for a longer trip, such as a vacation or longer business trip away from home, it may be best to store some supplies in your checked luggage, but keep an adequate stock on hand in case of any luggage issues or delays.


180 medical kids club drawstring bag to carry catheters

9. If your child is dependable in maintaining their own self-cathing schedule, they can utilize any of of the mentioned options above -- particularly a backpack or pencil case might be a great options.But if they have limited finger or hand dexterity or any difficulty with buttons or zippers, an easy-to-open drawstring bag, such as the one that you receive when you join the 180 Medical Kids Club for free, might be preferable. It can be draped from the back of a wheelchair, be left under a desk, or it can just sit it one's lap until it's time to cath. Also, if your child has other medical supplies that don't easily fit in the mentioned carrying options, such as diapers, you might be able to arrange a time to meet and discuss options with a trusted teacher or teacher's aide at your child's school. Odds are, there might be a spare cabinet or locker where they can safely store your child's supplies until it can be discreetly retrieved for use later. 


discreet catheters

10. Consider a catheter specifically designed both for maximum discretion and/or travel, such as a pre-lubricated compact catheter, a pocket catheter and lubrication, or a closed system (which can be utilized for sterile intermittent catheterization even when there might not be immediate access to toilets). Depending upon what your insurance plan covers, you might even be eligible to get catheters that include insertion supplies such as antiseptic wipes and gloves to further reduce your risk of UTIs when catheterizing in public restrooms.

When considering the right way to discreetly carry your supplies, be sure to keep your catheter inside its sterile packaging at all times until you are ready to use it to self-cath. This will help you to minimize your risk of infection. 

We understand that there are individual needs and preferences that will influence which solution might work best for your needs. Consider all the options that might best meet your requirements.

180 Medical makes it a point to train our staff well, so you can feel confidence when you contact us to discuss your catheter options. We offer instructional materials and will treat your needs as seriously as if you were a member of our own family. We also have a few employees on staff who have personal experience both with adjusting to life in a wheelchair and with using a catheter daily. Give us a call today to talk to one of our friendly, trained specialists at 1-877-688-2729 during business hours.
180 medical catheter showcase footer

About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 7 years. Her current job title is Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company. She loves writing, playing music, creating art, and spending quality time with her dogs, friends, & family.
 

Advanced Catheter Requirements With Medicare

by billf July 12 2016 08:04
advanced catheter requirements for medicare blog header


My name is Bill, and I have worked for 180 Medical for over 10 years. About 28 years ago, I was involved in a motocross accident that rendered me quadriplegic. You can learn more about my story here. Over the years since then, I've been able to help and counsel others who are also dealing with life after a spinal cord injury. I am happiest when I am helping others, and these days, I spend a lot of time just talking to our customers on the phone who are new to catheterizing. 

One thing that I often talk to people about are recurring urinary tract infections (also known more commonly as UTIs). It's an unfortunate truth that self-catheterization can carry a risk of getting UTIs, even for people practicing sterile use. One upside to this is that there are advanced products which may help reduce the risk of UTIs, such as closed system catheters.

Many people who are insured by Medicare or an insurance plan that follows Medicare's guidelines may not have that as an immediate option, but if you continue to get infections while cathing with a standard straight intermittent catheter and lubrication packets while on sterile use, you do have an option to get Medicare to cover an advanced product for your needs, such as closed system catheters or hydrophilic catheters with insertion supplies

If you have been practicing sterile use with a new catheter and a new lubrication packet each time you self-catheterize, and you have experienced at least two UTIs within the last 12 months, you could possibly qualify. But it's important to have proof in the form of documentation which includes a urine culture and any corresponding symptoms that you might have experienced while you had the UTI. Let's go into these two things a little more in detail.

Cultures

The first step to take is to go to the doctor whenever you feel like you have a urinary tract infection. You will need to be able to provide them with a urine specimen so that they can do a formal culture test to determine if it is indeed a UTI. 

If it's a positive culture report, documentation must show that the urine culture has greater than 10,000 CFU (colony forming units), which is a way to show that the bacteria is present and growing at high colony counts. This counts as positive proof of a urinary tract infection.

Concurrent Symptoms

The second piece of information needed is any documentation proving that you experienced a symptom at the same time as your culture was taken. It is important that you mention to your doctor if you have one of these symptoms, and that they are documented in the progress notes.

Qualifying concurrent symptoms are listed below:
  • A fever greater than 100.4ºF or 38ºC
  • A change in urgency, increased frequency of catheterization, or incontinence
  • Increased muscle spasms
  • Systemic leukocytosis, which is an abnormal increase in the number of circulating white blood cells in the complete blood count (CBC). This can be determined through a urinalysis, which is often taken along with a culture.
  • Autonomic dysreflexia: sweating, blood pressure elevation, abnormally slow heart rate
  • Prostatitis: acute or chronic inflammation of the prostate gland
  • Epididymitis: discomfort or pain of the epididymis
  • Orchitis: inflammation of one or both of the testes, characterized by swelling and pain

Other Requirements to Be Eligible

In order to qualify and begin receiving the advanced catheter products with Medicare, you had to have been already practicing sterile use during the times you had the infections documented, while using one standard catheters along with one lubrication packet per each time you self-catheterize. 

The following practices would unfortunately make you ineligible for advanced catheters:

  • If you don't practice sterile use (using a new catheter and a new lubrication packet each time you catheterize).
  • If you use lubrication packets more than once (not considered sterile use)
  • If you use a tube of lubricant instead of a new, sterile lubrication packet each time.
Having this information before going to see your doctor should give you a leg-up in the process of getting qualified for advanced catheters that could help further reduce incidences of UTIs, if you are insured by Medicare or another insurance plan that follows Medicare requirements. 

If you have more questions about how you can qualify, please contact one of our friendly, trained specialists for more information.

bill f signature footer

Closed System Catheters Can Help Those Adjusting to Life in a Wheelchair

by Jessica May 24 2016 21:00
Many new visitors to our website have just recently begun to transition to life in a wheelchair. Whether due to a medical condition, accident, or unexpected illness, we understand that this transition can be jarring. 

wheelchair stock

Our founder, Todd Brown, experienced this first-hand after his motocross accident, which left him paralyzed from the chest down. It took time for him to fully adjust to all the changes that came with being a new paraplegic, including struggles with frequent urinary tract infections at first. This can be common for those new to using catheters, since improper use (such as washing and reusing catheters) can lead to UTIs. 

If UTIs are something you've struggled with or want to prevent, consider the following:

1. Talk to your doctor.

Your doctor will be the best person to discuss any infections or illnesses, and they can come up with the right treatment plan based on your individual needs. 

2. Never reuse your catheters.

The FDA has determined that catheters are single-use devices, so be sure to use a catheter only once and then dispose of it, which can help you to avoid potential UTIs.

3. Make sure you're using your catheter properly.

Understanding how to properly catheterize will not only help lower the risk of UTIs, but it will also help you avoid unnecessary irritation. If you choose 180 Medical for your catheter supply needs, we can go over the process with you step-by-step, and we also provide instructional materials such as a detailed DVD and helpful booklets to provide you with the right education you need to get adjusted to your catheter insertion kit.

An important part of Todd's journey away from those frequent UTIs was learning about closed system catheters and their potential benefits for those in wheelchairs.

A closed system catheter can be a great solution for reducing the likelihood of UTIs for new catheter users. Not only does it provide everything in one easy-to-carry package, it also has specific features that can help you out with preventing UTIs as well as remaining in your wheelchair while catheterizing. 
  • Introducer Tip: This pre-lubricated tip on intermittent urinary catheters allows the users to bypass the first few millimeters of the urethra where the largest concentrations of bacteria are located.
  • Insertion Supplies: Closed system catheters often provide extra supplies that can help with the insertion process, such as sterile gloves (especially handy when cathing in public restrooms), antiseptic wipes to sterilize the area where you will insert the catheter, underpad, and more.
  • Ease of use while in a wheelchair: Because a closed system catheter is completely self-contained in a measurable bag, users can remain in their wheelchair, rather than attempt to transfer from chair to toilet every time. Also, any room that allows you privacy can become to a place to self-cath. 
180 Medical makes sure to train our staff well in order to earn the title "Specialist." That's why you can feel confident giving us a call when you're ready to begin ordering your catheter supplies. Not only do we offer helpful materials and treat you like a member of our own family, we have a few members of our staff who have personal experience adjusting to life in a wheelchair and using catheter daily. Give us a call today to see if closed system catheters could be right for you, and get one step closer to living more comfortably.

5 Highlights of Cure Medical Catheters

by Jessica April 14 2016 08:49

Buying the right catheter for your individual needs can make a difference in terms of cost, comfort, safety, and results. We carry quality products from all of the top name-brands on the market today, including GentleCath, Rusch, Bard, and more!

Just one of the many brands that we offer is Cure Medical. Here are some of the highlights and benefits of this particular brand of intermittent catheters:

  1. Latex-free: Not everyone has to worry about latex allergies, but it's important to know that a latex allergy can develop at any time. In most cases, it's best to just avoid the risk. Cure Medical catheters are 100% latex-free. 

    cure straight intermittent catheter
  2. Free of other allergens and chemical compounds: Have you heard of BPA or DEHP? Many people haven't, but these are compounds found in many common objects made of plastic. Research shows that BPA and DEHP can leech out of those plastics, and when they get into the body, they can possibly cause some issues. Both compounds are linked to thyroid problems, and DEHP is linked to a number of conditions including obesity, cancer, fertility issues, and immune disorders. Cure Medical guarantees that their catheters are BPA and DEHP-free.

  3. Easy to use: The guiding principle behind the development of Cure Medical's catheters was not only to make them safe but also easy for the average person to use. 

  4. Benefits a good cause: Cure Medical donates 10% of all their profits to medical research to find a cure for central nervous system disorders and spinal cord injuries. 


180 Medical is proud to carry a wide array of products from Cure, as well as many others. When you order your intermittent catheters from 180 Medical, you can be sure you're receiving a quality product. 
brands
Of course, the choice of which catheter to use is highly personal and depends on many factors, so no single brand or type of catheter is going to be right for everyone across the board. Please consult with your health care professional to discuss what type might be best for your needs, or contact one of our friendly, highly-trained specialists to discuss your options.

cath showcase footer

Are Closed System Catheters Right for My Child?

by Jessica April 8 2016 09:52
closed system catheters for kids blog title header

If your child has a condition that requires the use of intermittent catheters to drain their bladder, you may be wondering if they're using the right catheter for their individual needs. As a parent or guardian, your child's health, well-being, and comfort are likely some of your top priorities. So if they experience difficulty with cathing on their own, whether due to frequent urinary tract infections, concerns about privacy when self-cathing at school, or if they have limited mobility or dexterity, you might want to seek out a different option that could work better for their needs. 

HERE ARE A FEW INDICATIONS THAT MIGHT INDICATE YOUR CHILD IS READY TO TRY A CLOSED SYSTEM CATHETER:

1. Your child has frequent urinary tract infections. Intermittent catheterization can increase the risk of urinary tract infections (UTIs), particularly if your child is reusing catheters, which is not approved by the FDA, since catheters are designated Single Use Devices (SUDs). Various options such as a pre-lubricated or hydrophilic catheters can help keep the entire process of catheterization more smooth and well-lubricated from start to finish, which can help by reducing friction of the catheter against the urethra. Closed system catheters also often include an introducer or insertion tip, which allows the catheter to bypass the highest concentrations of bacteria located in the first few millimeters of the urethra, rather than pushing that bacteria further inside the body during insertion.  Another benefit to closed system catheters is the inclusion of insertion supplies which even further reduce risk of UTIs by including sterile gloves and antiseptic wipes.

insertion supplies2. Your child is in a wheelchair. A very handy feature of closed system catheters is the entirely self-contained system inside a measurable bag. This offers a new freedom to be able to remain sitting down in a wheelchair without having to expel a lot of effort to move over to a toilet in order to cath. Practically anywhere that allows privacy can be an option with the portability of an advanced catheter like closed systems. 

3. Your child has trouble remembering to wash their hands. With closed system catheters, they're an entirely self-contained system, often completely touch-free, such as the GentleCath™ Pro, which comes in pediatric French sizes and was designed to minimize risk of infection and allow for an easier and more sterile catheterization process. Many closed system catheter products are self-contained, which keeps your hands completely off of the catheter itself, so you can guide the tube out by manipulating it from outside of the self-contained collection bag. Of course, hand-washing is highly recommended for each and every time you go to the restroom to self-cath, especially in a public restroom, but for those occasional instances where a sink and soap is not readily available in one's chosen private cathing location, a closed system catheter can help minimize risk of infection from one's hands. As stated before, closed system catheters also include helpful insertion supplies such as sterile gloves to wear over the hands while self-cathing and antiseptic wipes to clean the area before insertion.

These are just a few of the many reasons why a closed system catheter could benefit your child. Learn more about closed system catheters here and view our entire selection of pediatric catheters here. Keep in mind that each situation and condition is unique to the individual, so closed system catheters may not be right for everyone. Please consult with your child's doctor or urologist to determine what may be the best option, or contact one of our friendly, highly-trained specialists to discuss your options and whether or not these advanced catheters would be covered on your insurance plan. 

kids club footer

About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for over 6 years and currently works as Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company! She loves writing, music, art, and & spending time with her dogs, friends & family.