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Tips for Cathing After Prostate Cancer Surgery

by Jessica July 13 2018 06:23
tips for catheterization after prostate cancer surgery


Each year, nearly 165,000 males in the United States are diagnosed with prostate cancer.

early detection and prevention of prostate cancerProstate cancer is the most common cancer in men other than skin cancer, and it is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men according to the American Cancer Society.

However, this slow-growing cancer is often very treatable and isn't necessarily fatal, particularly in cases where it is diagnosed early. This is why it's so important to make regular or annual appointments to see a urologist. Early detection is key.


Side Effects of Prostate Cancer Surgery

For those who are diagnosed with prostate cancer, there are a few treatment options. This will entirely depend on how severe the cancer growth is. The best course of action will come down to a mutual decision between you and your treating physician. 

Some may have to undergo a partial or full removal of the prostate by surgery, which is called a prostatectomy. This procedure is done to prevent the diseased portions or all of this walnut-sized gland from the body in order to prevent the cancer from spreading.

prostate cancer surgeryWhile it is considered a safe operation and usually very successful, there can be some side effects. According to the UCLA Prostate Cancer Program, “the surgery may weaken the muscles that control your urine flow. Surgery may also hurt the nerves that help control your bladder.” This is why some men occasionally experience urine leakage or symptoms of a neurogenic bladder after the surgery. In many cases, this side effect is temporary, but for some, this could be a long-term condition that requires treatment as well.

Depending on the symptoms and the severity, a protective undergarment or adult briefs may be a good option to absorb any leakage until the symptoms subside.

However, in other cases, it may be best to use an intermittent catheter to help empty the bladder and prevent urine leakage.


Tips for New Catheter Users After Prostate Cancer Surgery

Find the right intermittent Catheter for you.

You're unique, and so are your needs and preferences. That's why it's important to remember that no single type or brand of catheter is the best choice for everyone across the board. 

There are multiple types of disposable catheters available on the market today, so you have plenty of product options from which to choose. When it's time to begin selecting an intermittent catheter that will work best for you, be sure to consult with your prescribing healthcare professional to determine together what may work best for you, taking into account your lifestyle, preferences, medical condition, and anatomy. 

Straight intermittent catheters are considered the original technology. This type of catheter is uncoated and must be manually lubricated with separate lubricating jelly before insertion. Lubrication is typically sold separately in easy-to-open options like single-use travel-size packets or capped tubes. These are a simple catheter option, and some men prefer these due to their overall affordability and practicality.


straight caths for men


Hydrophilic catheters can be a great option, especially for those new to self-cathing, because of their convenience, sterility, and travel-readiness. Hydrophilic catheters have a coating that becomes slippery when activated by water and takes the place of typical lubricating jelly to make catheterization more smooth and comfortable. 


hydrophilic catheters for men


Closed system catheters are also great for sterile, no-touch cathing. Frequent travelers and those in wheelchairs also find closed systems to be incredibly handy and often easier to maneuver than standard straight catheters, since they are all-in-one systems with integrated collection bags. These often come with additional insertion supplies like ambidextrous gloves, antiseptic wipes, and other accessories to keep the cathing process hygienic.


closed system catheters for men


If you have any issues with inserting a straight tip, your doctor may recommend that you use a curved tip catheter known as a coudé catheter. Coudé catheters may help maneuver through tight spaces in the urethra like strictures and get past blockages.

Coudé tips are offered along with straight tips in every type of catheter listed above. Availability will depending on the brand and French size needed. 


keep it hygienic to reduce your risk of infection

Urinary tract infections are a common side effect among those who self-cath. There are ways to reduce the risk of urinary tract infections, such as using a touch-free catheter like a hydrophilic catheter or closed system catheter.

Do your best to keep your hands off the catheter tube to prevent contamination, and maintain a sterile environment.

On top of that, using your intermittent catheter just once and then disposing of it is a great way to reduce your risk of urinary tract infections.


talk to your doctor and follow their instructions.

Be sure to pay close attention to your doctors’ and nurses’ instructions regarding catheter use, including how frequently to catheterize per day and whether or not you should record your urine output for a period of time.

There are many misconceptions about cathing, which is why you should always be attentive and upfront with any questions to ensure you fully understand how to cath correctly. 


urologist prostate


Consider your catheter supplier options carefully.

Not all medical supply companies are equal when it comes to their brand selection, customer service, or product knowledge.

If you are asking “Where can I buy catheters?,” consider 180 Medical, the leading intermittent catheter supplier in the nation.

180 Medical offers an wide and varied selection of male length catheters from all of the top brands and manufacturers, including the newest products on the market with the latest advances in technology. 


intermittent catheter brands at 180 medical


On top of that, our team of trained and compassionate Specialists offer customer service that is second to none. We're happy to answer your questions, provide helpful instruction and educational materials, listen to all your concerns and preferences, and help you find the right catheter for your needs.

Using a catheter after prostate cancer surgery doesn't have to be scary or embarrassing to discuss.

If you're ready to look into your your catheter product options, give us a call today and find out how easy it is to get your first order of catheters. We'll be honored to help you as you heal from your surgery and transition into self-cathing.



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What You Need to Know About Overactive Bladder

by Jessica July 2 2018 06:05
what you need to know about oab


Do you find yourself suddenly needing to go to the bathroom without warning? Do you worry about socializing or spending time away from home because you're experiencing urine leakage? Do you need to urinate more often than usual or even experience unexpected urination at night (also known as nocturia)?

If so, it's possible you may be living with a form of urinary incontinence called overactive bladder.

We want to assure you that you are not the only one dealing with this condition. In fact, overactive bladder, which is also known as OAB, affects approximately 33 million Americans. However, according to the Official Foundation of the American Urological Association, that number may be higher than reported, since there are a lot of people living with symptoms of incontinence or overactive bladder who feel embarrassed to talk about it or see their doctor.

We want to empower you with the information you need to be able to ask for help and discuss your symptoms with your treating physician. Here are some answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about overactive bladder, which we hope will help you learn more about this condition, including its symptoms, potential causes, and treatment options.


What Is Overactive Bladder?

urge incontinence oabOveractive bladder is just what it sounds like: a bladder that's working overtime.

Some of the main symptoms of overactive bladder include:

  • sudden urge to urinate
  • urine leakage
  • making more trips to the bathroom than before

Those living with overactive bladder may also experience secondary symptoms, which may include:

  • fatigue from disrupted sleep due to nocturia
  • embarrassment
  • decreased social activity
  • depression


What Causes Overactive Bladder?

aging and oabOveractive bladder can happen to anyone at any time. However, it's important to know that both age and gender may potentially be related causes.

Pelvic floor muscles and even the muscles of the bladder sometimes weaken as our bodies age. This is one of the reasons why urinary incontinence tends to happen more frequently to women than men, since hormonal fluctuations and childbirth are a common cause of weakened pelvic floor muscles.

There are a variety of other factors that could trigger an overactive bladder.

Sometimes, people may experience symptoms of overactive bladder caused by lifestyle changes. These cases are are often only temporary.

alcohol intake and overactive bladderFor example, a night of drinking a little too much alcohol can lead to increased bladder activity and even bed-wetting. Drinking too many fluids in general makes one urinate more frequently as well. Bladder irritants and diuretics like caffeine can also function in the same way, leading the body to release more urine than normal. You may want to speak to your doctor about the right amounts and types of fluid to intake for your individual needs.

However, there are some serious underlying conditions that can cause chronic urinary incontinence and overactive bladder as well. Neurological disorders like Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Parkinson’s disease carry risk factors for overactive bladder. Diabetes and kidney disease are two others.

This is why it is so important to see your doctor and get properly diagnosed, especially if your symptoms have lasted for longer than a few days or weeks. 


How is Overactive Bladder Treated?

The treatment for an overactive bladder will mainly depend on the cause.

In some of the aforementioned instances of drinking too many fluids like alcohol or coffee, a little diet modification may be all that is necessary.

gentlecath straight catheterSometimes, it's as simple as strengthening your pelvic floor muscles. Your doctor may suggest specific exercises like Kegels to help strengthen those muscles and get your bladder back in proper working order.

Your doctor may also recommend the use of intermittent catheters.

Medication may also help some people, while surgery may be required in more serious situations. 

Again, the most important thing to know is that it is absolutely normal to experience these kinds of symptoms, and it is perfectly alright to ask for help from your healthcare provider. They will not judge or shame you; they're here to help you! If you notice symptoms of overactive bladder or other changes to your urinary system, we recommend that you schedule an appointment with your doctor as soon as possible.

If your treatment plan requires the use of intermittent catheters to help treat the symptoms of overactive bladder or urinary incontinence, 180 Medical is here for you every step of the way.

As the leading catheter supplier in the nation, we carry a full line of catheter products from the top brands and manufacturers on the market today.


popular catheter brands


Our catheter specialists are ready to help you find the right catheter product for your needs and preferences. Give us a call today!


Disclaimer: This blog should not be taken as medical advice and is only intended to provide a general understanding of overactive bladder. This information should not be used in place of any recommendations, prescribed treatment plans, or medical advice from your professional healthcare provider.



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The Full Guide to No-Touch Catheters

by AmyHernandez June 26 2018 05:51



Since the introduction of clean intermittent catheterization as an alternate way to drain the bladder, there have been many advances in cathing techniques as well as new types of catheter products.

No-touch catheterization techniques and no-touch catheters have become increasingly popular over the years. This is likely due to the convenience and independence these products can offer, as well as a way to reduce the occurrence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs).

UTIs and CAUTIs can be an issue for many people who perform intermittent self-catheterization, which is why sterility is most often at the top of the list of most important things to consider when deciding which intermittent catheter type is right for you.

WHAT IS A NO-TOUCH CATHETER?

A no-touch catheter, also known as a touch-free catheter or touchless catheter, is a urinary catheter that can be inserted without the user having to directly touch the catheter tube (the portion of the catheter system that is inserted into the urethra).

No-touch catheters have been available on the market for several years; however, they are generally called closed system catheters or sterile catheter kits.

Closed system catheters are either pre-lubricated or have a hydrophilic coating that is easily activated by sterile water to become lubricated. What makes a no-touch closed system catheter truly unique is that it is an all-in-one option that is housed inside its own sterile collection bag. The catheter tube can be easily manipulated and advanced forward to insert into the urethra without touching it, which minimizes the risk of contamination from the hands.

Another benefit of closed system catheters is that the majority of them come with what is known as an introducer tip. The introducer tip is usually a pre-lubricated, soft, flexible cover that shields the tip of the actual catheter tube and helps it bypass the first short section of the urethra where the highest concentrations of bacteria can be found. This also does its part in potentially reducing the risk of contracting a UTI.

Many brands of closed systems will come packaged with additional insertion supplies that can make the cathing process even more hygienic. This may include items like gloves and antiseptic wipes.

WHY SHOULD I USE A NO-TOUCH CATHETER?

There are many reasons why using a no-touch catheter might be the best option for you, depending on your lifestyle, preferences, and needs.

Of course, the added protection against contamination from touching and bacteria, as mentioned above, is a huge reason why many people prefer and chose to use no-touch catheters.

Touch-free catheterization has been shown to be incredibly effective at preventing the onset of catheter associated UTIs in spinal cord injured people. Clinical studies have shown the use of a no-touch catheter is associated with a 30% UTI reduction and general low UTI rates of .68% in a study conducted with spinal cord injured people.

Medicare may also cover these advanced catheter products for catheters users who have experienced two or more documented urinary tract infections (UTIs) within a single year while using sterile straight intermittent catheters and sterile lubrication packets.

In hospitals, the introduction of no-touch catheter systems and techniques has been well accepted by both caregivers and patients, and has not been associated with higher costs. On the contrary, it has actually reduced costs while saving time and reducing infection complications in general, according to Clinical studies.

NO-TOUCH CATHETER OPTIONS

There are a few different options when it comes to choosing a no-touch catheter system, depending on your insurance coverage. If your insurance policy does not currently cover closed system catheters, which are billed under HCPC code A4353, you may still be able to qualify for a hydrophilic catheter.

Here are the two main options of no-touch catheters:

Closed System Catheters

Closed system catheters are the preferred cathing system for many, including people in wheelchairs, children, and those frequently travel, work, or go to school. This is because of their convenience as well as the ability to reduce the risk of infection with the all-in-one system and introducer tip, which helps minimize the risk of contamination or pushing harmful bacteria into the bladder. One of the most popular closed system catheters on the market is the Bard Touchless Plus kit, which features a patented catheter guide, allowing for better control during insertion.

Hydrophilic Catheters

Hydrophilic catheters come pre-hydrated and ready to use, or they can be easily activated by an included sterile water packet. Once it’s ready to use, the catheter stays optimally lubricated and offers a more comfortable, smooth insertion. Hydrophilic catheters work to minimize urethral friction, which can also help reduce the risk of infection. Most hydrophilic catheters are considered no-touch catheters, thanks to included handling sleeves that keep your hands off of the catheter tube and help guide the catheter into the urethra. You may be interested in the popular GentleCath™ Glide, a no-touch hydrophilic catheter for both males and females. It was created specifically to make cathing more comfortable and reduce the mess sometimes left behind by alternate brands of hydrophilic catheters.

Intermittent straight catheters are not typically considered no-touch catheters, but there are cathing techniques which can reduce the risk of contamination from your hands, such as using gloves and antiseptic wipes during your catheterization routine.

Still not sure which catheter option is right for you? Contact us today and speak with a trained catheter specialist who can help you decide which intermittent catheter is best for your unique circumstances. Your health is too important to risk not using the right catheter product.

Disclaimer: Please note that this post is not to be taken as medical advice and is only intended to provide a general understanding of the potential risks of reusing catheters according to research. This information should not be used in place of the recommendations and medical advice of your professional healthcare provider.

Sources:Bennett CJ, Young MN and Darrington H. PubMed. 1995.

Bennett CJ, Young MN, Razi SS, Adkins R, Diaz F, McCrary A. PubMed. 1997.


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About the Author:

Amy is the Web Marketing Specialist at 180 Medical. Her favorite thing about working at 180 Medical is being part of a company that is truly committed to improving the lives of its customers. When she's not at work she enjoys traveling, kayaking, rock climbing, and spending time with her husband and three, incredible stepkids.

3 Tips to Prevent Stress Incontinence During Physical Activity

by Jessica May 17 2018 05:55
3 tips to prevent stress incontinence during exercise

May is National Physical Fitness & Sports Month, and now that the weather is warmer, many of us are ready to get active. You may feel like taking a walk or a roll in the park, participating in some adaptive sports with a team, or even competing in races for one of your favorite non-profit organizations or charities.

However, if you are one of the millions of people in America who live with urinary stress incontinence, your concerns about possible leakage or having an "accident" may be holding you back from taking part in your favorite physical activities.

lacing up for a runAt 180 Medical, we understand these fears and concerns. Every day, we talk to many customers who have urinary incontinence. We don't want anyone kept back from living a happy, independent, and active life if they are able, so we'd like to offer you some tips on how you may be able to prevent stress incontinence.

But first, let's talk a little bit more about stress incontinence and what causes it.


What is Stress Incontinence?

Stress incontinence is a type of urinary incontinence partial or complete loss of control over your bladder.

Most people who struggle with urinary incontinence experience involuntary release of urine from the bladder, often without warning.

With stress incontinence, urine loss may not be as severe, but it may occur more often during exercise, especially during activities that may increase pressure in your lower abdominal area. For this reason, you may also find you're experiencing some dribbling or leakage when you sneeze, cough, lift something, or laugh.

There are a few potential incontinence risk factors to know:

  • Age: Incontinence isn't something that happens to everyone as they grow older. It can affect anyone at any age, but it does tend to occur more frequently However, it does occur more often with increased age.
  • Gender: Although stress incontinence can happen to anyone, women tend to be a little more likely to experience this form of urinary incontinence than men. Female stress incontinence may be due in part to hormonal changes over one's lifetime, as well as the stretching of pelvic floor muscles during and after pregnancy or menopause.
  • Weight: Those living with a BMI above the recommended range may experience stress incontinence more frequently due to extra pressure on the internal organs, including the bladder.

losing weight to manage incontinence


Tips to Manage Stress Incontinence

1. Make Kegels a part of your daily exercise goals.

Many doctors recommend that their patients who live with stress incontinence start to focus on exercises that strengthen the pelvic floor muscles. Kegel exercises may be suggested to help manage your urinary incontinence issues.

Your pelvic floor muscles are partly responsible for helping your bladder hold onto urine until you're ready to go. If these muscles are strengthened, it's more likely that you'll have better control over your bladder's function, depending on the reason for your condition.

Ask your doctor about pelvic floor exercises like Kegels and whether this may be a good option for your individual situation.


2. Avoid diuretic drinks.

caffeine coffee is a diureticAlcoholic beverages and caffeinated drinks like coffee, soda, and tea are common culprits that can overstimulate the bladder. Diuretics dehydrate you and make your body lose more fluid, which in turn will make you need to use the restroom more often. This may cause more incidences of incontinence than if you consume fluids like water, juice, or other healthy and decaffeinated drinks.

Talk to your prescribing healthcare professional about how much fluid intake is right for your needs.


3. Drop excess weight.

Since extra weight, particularly in the abdominal region, can press on your bladder and cause leakage, it may be a good idea to lose weight to help reduce the occurrence of stress incontinence "accidents."

On top of that, fine-tuning your daily diet and exercising more often can improve your overall well-being and make it easier to enjoy the physical activities that you love. 

Consult with your doctor about whether you should lose any weight for your health. They can also discuss what could be the most efficient and healthiest way to lose weight for you.


Other Treatment Options for Incontinence

older couple walkingIf you have stress incontinence or any other symptoms of abnormal bladder function, please make an appointment to speak with your doctor. The sooner you can get your condition diagnosed, the sooner you can begin a treatment plan and get back to your normal life and favorite physical activities. 

In addition to treatment options such as lifestyle changes and prescription medication, your doctor might recommend the use of incontinence products like padded undergarments or external catheters.

It's possible that your doctor may also recommend that you begin draining your bladder with a urinary catheter to avoid leaking and dribbling and treat your incontinence issues. While this may sound intimidating at first, many people who live with urinary incontinence use intermittent catheter supplies every day and are able to participate in many of the same physical activities and sports that they enjoy. Even traveling with intermittent catheters can be a breeze once you get into a routine.

Has your doctor recommended that you start to use intermittent catheters as part of your individualized treatment plan? You may be asking yourself, "Where can I buy catheters?"

With over a decade of experience in specializing in intermittent catheter supplies, 180 Medical can provide you with the best quality intermittent catheters along with the best customer service in the business.

Contact us today!

Disclaimer: Please note that this is intended to provide a general understanding of stress incontinence and potential options for treatment. This information should not be used in place of the recommendations and treatment plan of your prescribing healthcare provider.



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Honoring Urology Nurses & Associates Week

by Jessica November 7 2017 05:47
At 180 Medical, we like to make sure we take time to recognize the hard work, care, and dedication that urology nurses and associates give in their jobs day in and day out. This week, in particular, is of great importance, because from November 1st to the 7th, it's Urology Nurses and Associates Week, a time to honor all of the contributions that urology professionals have made as well as the positive impact they make on their patients' lives.



Urology nurses, assistants, doctors, and associates play a crucial role in the care of their patients' overall well-being. It takes a truly compassionate person to care about their patients' health and listen to them when they discuss the symptoms they're having, which can sometimes feel embarrassing or difficult to talk about due to the private nature of some urological conditions. Being empathetic and kind is just as big a part of their job as it is to be fully trained and knowledgeable about the various conditions that can affect their patients, such as neurogenic bladder, prostate cancer, incontinence, bladder retention, urinary tract infections, and other illnesses that may affect any part or the whole of the urinary system.

urology nurses associates week 2017  180 medical rep quoteWhether they work in roles with surgery, office visits, testing, or even demonstrating to their patient how to use an intermittent catheter for the very first time, urology nurses and associates all have important roles in healthcare, and that's why Urology Nurses and Associates Week was established back in 2006 by the Society of Urologic Nurses and Associates (SUNA). 180 Medical is a proud corporate sponsor of SUNA, and we are glad to do what we can to raise awareness and recognize the incredible importance of the work they do.

"Urology nurses often tell me that they want their patients to feel like family, not just another patient or a number, and I'm happy to work for a company that feels the same way," says Krista Howard, one of 180 Medical's Urology Territory Specialists. "When they refer their patients to 180 Medical, they know they will receive the same level of care and compassion that urology nurses give every day in their jobs."

Since we provide intermittent catheters, urostomy supplies, and other urological supplies, we regularly interact with urology offices and the nurses at these great facilities. We feel honored to be chosen as a preferred provider for their patients' much-needed medical supplies, and we're proud to act as an extension of all of the urology nurses, doctors, and associates at their facilities by offering their patients the right supplies they need to turn their lives around, alongside superior customer service and the kind of compassion we know our customers deserve.

If your life has been touched by a urology nurse or associate, we encourage you to reach out and let them know about the positive impact they made on you during a time when you needed a kind word and a helping hand during this week. They truly deserve recognition for all the hard work they do.


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About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 8 years and is the Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for a company that truly cares both for its employees and its customers.

 

The Importance of Seeing a Urologist

by billf March 22 2017 07:12
the importance of seeing a urologist

 My name is Bill, and I have worked for 180 Medical for over 10 years. bill f 180 medicalAbout 26 years ago, I was involved in a motocross accident that rendered me quadriplegic. You can learn more about my story here. Over the years since then, I've been able to use my experiences to help and counsel others who are also dealing with life after a spinal cord injury. I am happiest when I am helping others, and these days at 180 Medical, I spend a lot of time talking to our customers on the phone who are new to self-catheterizing.

There are a lot of people who use intermittent catheters and mainly rely on their general practitioner for their checkups and healthcare needs. While this is perfectly fine, it may be a good idea to see a urologist annually for a more thorough checkup. Since urologists specialize in conditions relating to the entire urinary system as well as the male reproductive organs, they may be able to better pinpoint issues that your general practitioner might not catch.

What to Expect at an Annual Exam with a Urologist

Seeing a urologist may seem intimidating at first, but generally, an annual exam is fairly simple and could be potentially life-saving, depending on what symptoms you may be experiencing. There are various procedures that your urologist may use to check for any abnormalities or potential issues, including growths, infections, or stones.

Some tests or examinations that you may be able to expect, depending upon what the doctor thinks is necessary for your individual situation, may include:

  • A physical exam
  • A urine specimen
  • A cystoscopy (where the lower urinary tract is examined with a mini camera) 
  • Imaging studies (ultrasound or x-ray, most typically) 
  • Urodynamics
  • A tissue biopsy

Bladder Cancer and Other Factors to Consider

An annual exam is a wise idea for anyone using catheter supplies, but it's also important to see your doctor if there are any unusual or out-of-the-ordinary symptoms as soon as possible. Waiting on treating something as small as urinary tract infection may lead to the condition becoming a more serious issue.

Bladder irritation may increase the risk of bladder cancer, and this can be from various issues such as repeated UTIs (urinary tract infections) or bladder infections, use of a foley catheter, and bladder stones. There are higher rates of bladder cancer among tobacco users, so if you smoke or vape, this is also a great reason to get a regular check-up.

Additionally, if you are living with a neurogenic bladder or a SCI (spinal cord injury), you may want to consider the importance of checking for bladder cancer regularly too. The risk for this disease for those with SCIs is about "15 times higher than that of the general population" (New Mobility).

Since bladder cancer does not always have obvious symptoms, especially in the beginning stages, it's incredibly important to have a specialist like a urologist look over your bladder and urinary system in its entirety regularly so that any potential issues can be caught early.

Year-Round Maintenance of Your Urinary System's Health

As always, the best thing you can do for your bladder, kidneys, and the rest of your urinary system is to follow your healthcare professional's recommendations.

This may include such advice as:

  • Take any medications you have been prescribed as directed
  • Keep properly hydrated according to your individual needs
  • Continue regular check-ups with your urologist, especially in the case of any unusual or out-of-the-ordinary symptoms
  • Always use good hygiene when using intermittent catheters, such as practicing sterile use versus washing and reusing, washing your hands well, and using disinfecting wipes or swabs
  • Catheterize according to the schedule laid out by your doctor, which is typically going to be often enough to keep the urine volume inside your bladder under 10 ounces
  • Use adequate sterile, water-soluble lubrication when cathing to avoid make catheterization more comfortable
  • Consider using a hydrophilic catheter to further reduce irritation to the urethra and bladder, or a catheter with a gripper or sleeve to avoid touching the catheter directly, which can reduce the risk of infection

At 180 Medical, we not only provide top-quality intermittent catheter supplies; we also offer helpful, educational material whenever possible to make sure you have all the information you need, including instructions on how to self-cath. For more information about catheters that could be right for your needs, feel free to contact us. If you have any questions or seek medical advice, please be sure to consult with your healthcare professional. 

Disclaimer: Please note that this is intended to provide a general understanding of bladder health and the importance of seeing a doctor. It should not be used in place of a visit, call, or consultation with a physician or other professional healthcare provider.

References: 
'Surprising Link': Smoking and Bladder Cancer
What You Need to Know About Bladder Cancer and SCI

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bill bio pic 180 medical employee
Bill has worked for 180 Medical for over 10 years. He loves getting to talk to our customers, sharing his first-hand experiences as a quadriplegic, and helping those with in-depth questions about self-catheterization. He enjoys spending time outdoors, as well as watching and attending motocross events. Learn more about Bill's story.

The Importance of National Doctors' Day

by Jessica March 30 2016 12:23

doctors day

2016 is the 83rd year to celebrate and recognize National Doctors' Day in the United States. The very first Doctor’s Day to be observed on record was March 30th, 1933, when Eudora Brown Almond, wife of Dr. Charles B. Almond, decide to take a day to honor physicians for their hard work and dedication to their occupations. She and others who participated in the first Doctors' Day mailed out kind greeting cards letting physicians know how important their work is. Others placed flowers and other tokens on the graves of doctors who had passed away already. 

President George H.W. Bush signed National Doctors' Day into public law, which officially designated March 30th of every year as the day to recognize doctors for their contributions to healing and changing lives. It's a great time to call attention to the dedication and commitment of physicians across the country who work to better the quality of others' lives.

Their work certainly does not go unnoticed at 180 Medical, and this is a day we gladly celebrate. We are honored to be able to work with many of the top urologists, rehabilitation physicians, and doctors specializing in ostomies. We would like to thank all doctors around the country and the world for the amazing work you do every day and the ways that you, too, exemplify the 180 way. 

National Doctors’ Day is just one day out of the year, but we are thankful and appreciative for you every day of our lives!

Source: http://www.doctorsday.org/



About the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 6 years and currently works as Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. 
 

How Your Urinary System Works

by Jessica January 8 2016 19:25

At 180 Medical, we strive to make sure you have all the information you need to stay as healthy as possible when it comes to your catheterization needs. Here’s a helpful infographic with information on how your body works to process waste via the urinary system (also known as the renal system). 

Contact us at 180 Medical if you're seeking a catheter supplier. We have the expertise to help you find the right catheter for your needs!

180 Medical Honors Urology Nurses and Associates Week

by Jessica November 3 2015 18:19
Urology Nurses and Associates Week has begun as of this Monday, and we like to take time each year to emphasize the importance of this week. We issued a press release earlier to highlight our enthusiasm for this celebration of nurses and medical professional who work so hard to provide the care needed for their patients. 
Happy Urology Nurses and Associates Week from 180 Medical
180 medical representativeEach year, Urology Nurses and Associates Week takes place in the first week of November, dedicated specifically to the nurses, nurses' assistants, and other healthcare workers that have chosen the field of urology. Each of them serves a crucial role within the healthcare system. Some work primarily in continence care, providing the education and support our customers' need to live their lives as normally as possible. Others act in roles within oncology, surgery, cystoscopy, urodynamics, and more. No matter where they work and the position they serve, they provide a necessary role that is integral to their patients' well-being. 

As providers of intermittent catheters and other urological supplies, we interact with urology nurses daily, taking time to understand what is needed for their patients. We're grateful to all urology nurses, associates, and doctors for choosing 180 Medical to provide their patients with their needed catheter supplies along with top-notch customer service. Here are a few reasons why they choose us and consistently stick with us for patient referrals:

  • One-stop Referral Option: Nurses are busy, and convenience is one of the many reasons they choose 180 Medical for their patient referrals. 
    There's not a lot of time in their packed day to seek out a provider that can handle supply needs and is also contracted with that specific patient's insurance company. 180 Medical understands that nurses need a quick and efficient option to fill out a referral so that their patients can obtain the supplies they need. With 180 Medical, it's as simple as faxing or emailing the referral to us. From there, we work hard to process and verify the patient's insurance and call them within the same day during business hours. If we don't carry the supplies the patient needs, or if we happen to not be contracted with that patient's insurance, we personally handle finding and referring the patient to a company that can! This way, we make sure the patient can get their needed medical supplies, whether we end up supplying them or not. 
  • Individualized Care: At 180 Medical, we understand that every situation is different. Each patient's needs are as unique as the individuals themselves. Our customer specialists will work hard to get the best product for each patient, while working with the urology nurse's recommendations. We also take time to educate patients on how best to use a catheter hygienically, even offering time to help them with a step-by-step walk-through of the process of catheterization. This helps the referring nurse or associate to lessen any follow-up needs on their part. 
Urology Nurses and Associates Week was started to create awareness about the tireless effort that urology nurses perform, as well as the illnesses and conditions that cause urological issues, including spinal cord injuries, spina bifida, multiple sclerosis, neurogenic bladder, and more. While many people may feel some fear or concern after being told they will need to use catheters, whether short-term or permanently, urology nurses help by offering solutions that will allow the patient to feel comfortable with their daily routines including self-catheterization and other options. They not only teach them how to function as normally as possible once again; they provide the physical and emotional support that is often needed in these situations. Sometimes all it takes is a listening ear, other times it takes a guiding hand to show what is possible. Urology nurses have helped so many patients in so many situations, so it's impossible to describe all that they do and how they positively affect others' lives. 

We are proud of being able to act as an extension of the compassionate care and service of all of the urology nurses, doctors, and associates at their facilities. We encourage our readers to promote this well-deserved week. 

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September is Interstitial Cystitis Awareness Month

by Jessica September 15 2014 12:42
We here at 180 Medical want to do our part in raising awareness this month about a painful condition called Interstitial Cystitis.

According to the Interstitial Cystitis Network, as many as one out of every 26 people in the USA right now may be living with symptoms of Interstitial Cystitis. But what is Interstitial Cystitis? And why is it important that we all do our part in raising awareness about this condition?

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Interstitial Cystitis and Its Symptoms

Also known as Bladder Pain Syndrome (BPS), Interstitial Cystitis is a feeling that ranges from minor discomfort to great pain or pressure around the pelvic area, most specifically the bladder.

Symptoms can include:

  • Bladder pain or pain throughout the pelvis or genitals
  • Urgency to rush to the restroom to relieve yourself
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Urinary frequency
  • Nocturia
  • Pain during intimacy

It can happen to anyone, but it seems to be more prevalent in women. Many who are affected by the symptoms aren't even aware that they have it. This is why it's important to spread awareness, so that those who are affected can seek treatment.

While there is no cure currently, there are a variety of treatments available that can help lessen the symptoms and make it much more manageable. If you have difficulty urinating, for instance, it may be as simple as starting a self-catheterization regimen. If you're experiencing any of these symptoms, contact your doctor today.


What Can I Do To Raise Awareness About Interstitial Cystitis?

  • It's easy to feel like you don't have the power to raise much awareness. But if you use any form of social media (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, or more), you have a great tool in your hands to share information and spread awareness. You can start out just by sharing a link to the IC Awareness Month official website at http://www.icawareness.org or sharing a link to this blog post from 180 Medical.
  • Hand out flyers or hang a poster at your school, job, or local church.
  • Talk to your doctor about putting up a poster or keeping brochures about Interstitial Cystitis available for patients and visitors to the office.
  • Spread awareness by wearing your turquoise IC Awareness Ribbon or displaying it as a car magnet. Find yours at the ICN shop here.


Interstitial Cystitis Resources

Remember, if you are living with Interstitial Cystitis, you're not the only one. There are resources available to you for learning and connecting with a vast network of others who are dealing with symptoms like yours.




180 medical jessAbout the Author:

Jessica has worked for 180 Medical for 5 years and currently holds the title of Purchasing & Marketing Coordinator. Her favorite things about 180 Medical are her great co-workers and getting to work for such a fun, caring company.